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Un véhicule a foncé ce mercredi sur un groupe de militaires de l'opération Sentinelle à Levallois-Perret (Hauts-de-Seine) faisant six blessés dont deux graves Stampa E-mail
Scritto da Umberto Renda   

Militaires renversés par une voiture à Levallois-Perret: un mode opératoire qui fait penser à un attentat terroriste

 

Selon une information de France info, un véhicule a foncé ce mercredi 9 en début de matinée sur un groupe de militaires du 35e régiment d'infanterie, déployés dans le cadre de l'opération Sentinelle à Levallois-Perret (Hauts-de-Seine), faisant six blessés dont deux plus sérieusement touchés. D'après la préfecture de police, le pronostic vital des militaires renversés n'est pas engagé. 

Le conducteur du véhicule a pris la fuite et est activement recherché par les forces de l'ordre. Selon les informations de L'Express qui cite une source policière, le caractère intentionnel de l'action "serait retenu" bien qu'il soit trop tôt pour parler d'une action terroriste. Selon les informations dévoilés par BFMTV, le maire de Levallois-Perret, Patrick Balkany, a précisé que le véhicule était "pré-positionné" devant le casernement des militaires qui se situe Place Verdun avant de leur foncer dessus.

 

Un suspect a été arrêté par la BRI ce mercredi 9 vers 13h dans le cadre de la traque du conducteur qui a volontairement lancé son véhicule sur des soldats déployés à Levallois-Perret (Hauts-de-Seine) dans le cadre de l'opération Sentinelle. Selon BFMTV, qui révèle l'information, l'arrestation s'est déroulée sur l'autoroute A16 au nord de Paris et a été "mouvementée". L'individu a été blessé par cinq balles au cours d'un échange de tirs et un policier a également été touché par un coup de feu précise Le Parisien.

On ignore pour l'instant s'il s'agit de l'auteur de l'attaque contre les militaires mais l'homme est clairement suspecté dans cette affaire. FranceInfo rapporte ainsi que, selon une source judiciaire, l'individu se trouvait "à bord du véhicule recherché". "L'homme interpellé, né en 1980, est susceptible d'être l'auteur" de l'attaque "car il était à bord du véhicule recherché et a tenté de prendre la fuite", rapporte une source judiciaire au journal Le Parisien.

 

source francesoir.fr

Un suspect a été arrêté par la BRI ce mercredi 9 vers 13h dans le cadre de la traque du conducteur qui a volontairement lancé son véhicule sur des soldats déployés à Levallois-Perret (Hauts-de-Seine) dans le cadre de l'opération Sentinelle. Selon BFMTV, qui révèle l'information, l'arrestation s'est déroulée sur l'autoroute A16 au nord de Paris et a été "mouvementée". L'individu a été blessé par cinq balles au cours d'un échange de tirs et un policier a également été touché par un coup de feu précise Le Parisien.

On ignore pour l'instant s'il s'agit de l'auteur de l'attaque contre les militaires mais l'homme est clairement suspecté dans cette affaire. FranceInfo rapporte ainsi que, selon une source judiciaire, l'individu se trouvait "à bord du véhicule recherché". "L'homme interpellé, né en 1980, est susceptible d'être l'auteur" de l'attaque "car il était à bord du véhicule recherché et a tenté de prendre la fuite", rapporte une source judiciaire au journal Le Parisien.

 
BREAKING North Korea appears to have fired missile that may have landed in Japan's territorial waters Stampa E-mail
Scritto da Umberto Renda   

North Korea conducts new ballistic missile test

 

North Korea has conducted another missile test, Japanese and South Korean officials say.

The missile appeared to land in the sea off Japan, the Japanese national broadcaster NHK said.

In early July, Pyongyang claimed to have successfully tested an intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) for the first time.

That test was the latest in a series conducted in defiance of a UN ban. The range of the latest test is not known.

The range of North Korea's ICBM has been disputed, but some experts said it could reach Alaska.

Pentagon spokesman Captain Jeff Davis said a launch appeared to have been conducted and that more information was awaited.

The latest missile test is the 14th test carried out by North Korea in 2017.

The missile was launched at 23:41 North Korea time (15:41 GMT) from Jagang province in the north of the country, South Korean news agency Yonhap reported.

 

SOURCE BBC.CO.UK

 
Nobel laureate Liu Xiaobo, who was China's most prominent human rights and democracy advocate, has died aged 61. Stampa E-mail
Scritto da Umberto Renda   

Liu Xiaobo: China's most prominent dissident dies

 

 he activist had been serving an 11-year prison term for "subversion" and was recently moved to a hospital for treatment for terminal liver cancer.

A university professor turned tireless rights campaigner, Mr Liu was branded a criminal by authorities.

The Nobel Committee said the "Chinese government bore a heavy responsibility for his premature death".

The campaigner was repeatedly jailed throughout his life. When not in prison, he was subject to severe restrictions while his wife, Liu Xia, was placed under house arrest.

Mr Liu died "peacefully", surrounded by his wife and other relatives, a doctor who treated him said. His final words to Liu Xia were: "Live on well," the South China Morning Post reported.

 

Source bbc.co.uk

 
So-called Islamic State (IS) defences in the Iraqi city of Mosul are collapsing fast and troops expect to take full control in the next few hours, state television has announced. Stampa E-mail
Scritto da Umberto Renda   

Battle for Mosul: IS defeat imminent, says state TV

 

Only a few metres remain to be taken, a correspondent said.

Some Iraqi security forces have been seen dancing in the streets even though commanders have nor confirmed the news.

Iraqi forces, backed by US-led air strikes, have tried to retake the key city since 17 October last year.

 

The government announced the full "liberation" of eastern Mosul in January, but the west of the city has presented a more difficult challenge, with its narrow, winding streets.

The UN has warned that IS may be holding more than 100,000 people in the city as human shields.

Last October, the Iraqi army said there were 6,000 militants in the city. Fewer than 300 were thought to be holding out.

Some 900,000 people have been displaced from the city since 2014 - about half the the pre-war population- aid organisations say.

Last month, Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi said the destruction of the ancient mosque in the city of Mosul was "an official declaration of defeat" by IS.

Iraqi forces say IS blew up the Great Mosque of al-Nuri and its famous leaning minaret as jihadists battled to stop advancing pro-government troops.

 

source bbc.co.uk

 

 

 

 
Researchers have unlocked the chemistry of Roman concrete which has resisted the elements for thousands of years. Stampa E-mail
Scritto da Umberto Renda   

Scientists explain ancient Rome's long-lasting concrete

 

Ancient sea walls built by the Romans used a concrete made from lime and volcanic ash to bind with rocks.

Now scientists have discovered that elements within the volcanic material reacted with sea water to strengthen the construction.

They believe the discovery could lead to more environmentally friendly building materials.

Unlike the modern concrete mixture which erodes over time, the Roman substance has long puzzled researchers.

Rather than eroding, particularly in the presence of sea water, the material seems to gain strength from the exposure.

In previous tests with samples from ancient Roman sea walls and harbours, researchers learned that the concrete contained a rare mineral called aluminium tobermorite.

They believe that this strengthening substance crystallised in the lime as the Roman mixture generated heat when exposed to sea water.

Researchers have now carried out a more detailed examination of the harbour samples using an electron microscope to map the distribution of elements. They also used two other techniques, X-ray micro-diffraction and Raman spectroscopy, to gain a deeper understanding of the chemistry at play.

This new study says the scientists found significant amounts of tobermorite growing through the fabric of the concrete, with a related, porous mineral called phillipsite.

The researchers say that the long-term exposure to sea water helped these crystals to keep on growing over time, reinforcing the concrete and preventing cracks from developing.

"Contrary to the principles of modern cement-based concrete," said lead author Marie Jackson from the University of Utah, US, "the Romans created a rock-like concrete that thrives in open chemical exchange with seawater."

 

The ancient mixture differs greatly from the current approach. Modern buildings are constructed with concrete based on Portland cement.

This involves heating and crushing a mixture of several ingredients including limestone, sandstone, ash, chalk, iron and clay. The fine material is then mixed with "aggregates", such as rocks or sand, to build concrete structures.

The process of making cement has a heavy environmental penalty, being responsible for around 5% of global emissions of CO2.

So could the greater understanding of the ancient Roman mixture lead to greener building materials?

Prof Jackson is testing new materials using sea water and volcanic rock from the western United States. Speaking to the BBC earlier this year, she argued that the planned Swansea tidal lagoon should be built using the ancient Roman knowledge of concrete.

"Their technique was based on building very massive structures that are really quite environmentally sustainable and very long-lasting," she said.

"I think Roman concrete or a type of it would be a very good choice [for Swansea]. That project is going to require 120 years of service life to amortise [pay back] the investment.

"We know that Portland cement concretes contain steel reinforcements. Those will surely corrode in at least half of that service lifetime."

 

There are a number of limiting factors that make the revival of the Roman approach very challenging. One is the lack of suitable volcanic rocks. The Romans, the scientists say, were fortunate that the right materials were on their doorstep.

Another drawback is the lack of the precise mixture that the Romans followed. It might take years of experimenting to discover the full formula.

The research has been published in the journal American Mineralogist.

 

SOURCE 

 
 
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